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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: [Acro] IAC rules amok, it's a safety thing!

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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: [Acro] IAC rules amok, it's a safety thing!



                


Thread: [Acro] IAC rules amok, it's a safety thing!

Message: [Acro] IAC rules amok, it's a safety thing!

Follow-Up To: ACRO Email list (for List Members only)

From: Gmirk at aol.com

Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2002 17:23:08 UTC


Message:

  Hi all,

I have two issues:  1. This seems to be a safety issue and not a category 
issue.  2. Virginia's characterization of pilots as honest, safety minded 
rule followers that value proper training.  Although it would be nice to 
believe that this is how pilots are, and I would agree that in many cases 
Virginia is correct, experience proves otherwise.  After years of g/a and 
commercial flying (that's many many hours of dual given in addition to the 
airlines) my opinion is that pilots are not that different from the 
population as a whole.  Most people, when involved in a structured activity, 
do follow the rules and generally act in a way that they believe is 
acceptable to the group, but these are not the people that we are concerned 
with.  

The United States is one of the least regulated when it comes to general 
aviation.  Pilots will generally fall into one of three categories:  those 
that go beyond the established minimums, those that adhere to the bare 
minimums, and those that fall far below the minimums.  It is obviously the 
folks in the latter of the two categories that we must be concerned with, and 
yes that is where local policing comes into play.  Many the aircraft renter 
can't understand why his local FBO requires him to fly more often than FAR 91 
requires.  Yes, it's an insurance thing, but do you want a guy flying who has 
only done 3 t/o and landings every 90 days for the last year and a half?  

OK, so what we are talking about is a safety thing, well that's not all that 
hard, is it?  Set up a training standard, create a way to maintain currency, 
and find a reasonable way to grandfather in those with the requisite 
credentials.  Isn't that how it works for the IAC judges?  I know this is how 
it works at any airline, and for every pilot certificate out there.  Oh yes, 
it will be more restrictive than the current regs, and it will cost some 
money!

The above is not a panacea and accidents will not stop.  In fact there would 
be no real way to gauge the efficacy of such a measure in the short term, and 
there is the rub when it comes to aviation safety.  When aviation safely 
works, nothing happens, and in an inherently safe activity that is a hard 
sell.

Most assuredly there will be folks who complain that they have been screwed 
by the new rules, and some may very well have a legitimate complaint; well 
nothing is perfect so suck it up and get with the program.  Remember the old 
joke, "what whines louder than the airplane engine?  The pilots."    

As far as the basic/primary debate is concerned, only time will tell, and 
these things can change so give it a chance.  Just remember to keep your eyes 
on the prize, and to me that is to keep the sport safe.  Wouldn't it be nice 
if the only memorial contest, or award, was held for someone who died of old 
age after a long enjoyable aerobatic career? 

That's all, I'm off to commit some acts of aviation.

Cheers,
Greg Mirkin
S1-T, N230JM 


                


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