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Dear Steve
 
I'm not one to brag but when I was not more than a wee lass I joined an expedition to photograph the rare Amazonian Cuss Cuss. While flying low along the Amazon river with my colleague Sir Regional Pittafore the engine in our S2B suddenly quit and I was forced to make an emergency landing along the bank of the Amazon. After lining up two alligators I made a perfect wheel landing and use the gators as skies to the rivers shore. Once we stopped on the bank Sir Regional and myself climbed out of our trusty steed only to be confronted by Pygmies shooting  poisonous darts. Dear Reggie took one in the leg and I was forced to throw him over my shoulder and hi tail it into the jungle. I carried Sir Regional on my back for a day and a half until we came along a small tribe of head hunters. These weren't your normal run of the mill head hunters no, these were greatly feared entrepreneur head hunters. They weren't interested in shrunken heads they had many of them around and they proved difficult to trade. They were more into DVD's and Walkmans. Realizing what grave danger we were now in Sir Regional quickly pulled from his back pack a new Sony TV, not just any TV I might add but a beautiful 19" Trinitron! Much to our relief the tribal leader was very pleased and stared at what a wonderful thing lay before his feet and thought of what he could do when they harnessed electricity. The tribal witch doctor cured dear Reggie of the poison that cursed through his veins with a simple potion and a bill for 50 pounds. After all medicine doesn't come cheap when you are deep in the jungle. With a few beads, trinkets and Reggies Rolex we were able to barter for a few liters of petrol and be off on our way in search of the rare Cuss Cuss.
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Pennypacker
To: 'acro'
Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 12:07 PM
Subject: [Acro] Re: Landing Pitts

Wimps.  All of you, wimps!

In the rainforest I fashioned stone tools to cut a landing zone through the
trees.  Lost my arms wrestling a tiger for dinner (he was delicious) when
it was about ten feet wide, so I cleared the low lying brush with my teeth.
 Flew the approaches knife-edge, holding the stick with my knees.  Landed
on 3 parallel logs to keep the wheels from sinking into the muck.  Had to
dodge the purple spotted African spiny six-fingered tree toads that would
invariably perch on the logs.  They're endangered you know.

But the real bitch was refining the crude oil I dug out of the ground to
make fuel.



On Tuesday, May 28, 2002 6:00 AM, Virginia Jacobson
[SMTP:Virginia@odysseypub.com] wrote:
> I don't know what you guys are complaining about. When I was a kid we
> couldn't even afford a landing strip we had to land in a farmers field
> with the COWS! You don't know what a difficult landing is until you
> get a up close to a Moo Cow........ <G>
>
> Virginia Jacobson
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ----------
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Larry Lowe
> To: acro@gf24.de
> Cc: acro@gf24.de
> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 2:47 PM
> Subject: [Acro] Re: Landing Pitts
>
>
>
>
> ACCassidy@aol.com wrote:
> >
> > Eighteen feet, eighteen feet. You lucky, lucky bas****s. When we
> were kids,
> > we were so poor we had to land on a strip that was only six inches
> wider than
> > the wheels. And there was a drop on each side, into a pit full of
> sharks. It
> > was downhill in both directions and there was always a 25-knot
> crosswind...
> >
> > Tee hee
>
>
> That's nothing.
>
> Back where I come from, the strip was just like yours, but only a mere
> four inches wider than the wheels.
>
> And covered with ice....
>
> Larry Lowe
>
>

© Dr. Günther Eichhorn
Retired
Email Guenther Eichhorn