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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: Elimination of Aerobatic Box

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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: Elimination of Aerobatic Box



                


Thread: Elimination of Aerobatic Box

Message: Re: Elimination of Aerobatic Box

Follow-Up To: ACRO Email list (for List Members only)

From: Steve Pennypacker <spenny at vis.com>

Date: Fri, 11 Apr 1997 18:55:23 UTC


Message:

  There seem to be a few distinct issues here, all of which I believe point
towards retaining the box.

1.  Should the rules determine aircraft design and piloting, or vice versa?
It's pointless to have rules if groups of competitors can change the ones
they don't like.  When race cars get too fast for a given track, they change
the rules to slow them down or they find ways to make them corner better,
they don't build bigger tracks.  

2.  Does the requirement to fly within the confines of the box contribute to
determining a pilot's skill, which is what a contest is all about, or is it
simply an artificial nuisance to the pilots?  Clearly it takes an additional
level of skill to manage a sequence not only within the boundaries but even
within specified portions of the box.  If a maneuver is completed
imperfectly, it is much more difficult to correct, hide, or set up for the
next maneuver when that next maneuver must be initiated almost immediately.
This will cause mistakes to be that much more visible to the judges, thus
helping to separate the best pilots from the rest.

3.  Logistics of having to set up box markers.  Unless inability to get
people to do this work is causing contests not to be held, this issue should
be lower priority than the others.  I haven't heard anyone say the logistics
are actually preventing contests from being flown.

4.  Without a box, how do you quantify presentation?  A big airplane far out
looks the same as a small one close in.  


Steve Pennypacker


                


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