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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: [IAC-L:655] Re: Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps

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ACRO E-mail Archive Thread: [IAC-L:655] Re: Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps



                


Thread: [IAC-L:655] Re: Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps

Message: [IAC-L:655] Re: Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps

Follow-Up To: ACRO Email list (for List Members only)

From: ultimate at spindle.net (ultimate@spindle.net)

Date: Mon, 11 Aug 1997 02:08:14 UTC


Message:

 Gary wrote:
> 
> Hello Members, Can anyone tell me the best type of stainless steel to
> use for mounting a fuel tank in my Pitts S-1? 303 or 304 stainless
> or?
> Also, can any one direct me to a source for a small camera base mount
> that could be modified to mount on the vertical stabalizer of a
> Pitts?
> Thanks, Gary IAC#11610
> tailwind at ptd.net


Gary:

I don't know the alloy, but if you live near a big city, go to a
restaurant equipment manufacturer and get them to shear you some 1" by
050" stainless like they use for making counters and such in
restaurants, grocery store check out lanes, etc.  I used it for my tank
straps and it works just fine.  It's weldable by TIG and the 1" width is
perfect for the C channel rubber extrusion used as a cusion against the
tank that's sold by homebuilt suppliers.

If you TIG weld any part of the straps, don't weld across it, only along
the edge and small rosette welds in the middle.  

A lot of older Pitts built from plans used mild steel straps.  I know a
guy that just rebuilt his S-1 originally built in 1971 or 1972 that used
mild steel straps.  He sand-blasted them and reprimed them and is using
them again.  Very simple.  You can get mild steel from machine and sheet
metal shops.  Don't get any galvanized, by the way.  I think the
galvanized stuff gets "embrittled" by the zinc coating process.  The
alloy is something like 1020 or 1030 though they may call it something
else.  It welds easily if it's pure, but that's not always the case.

Good luck.

Daryle L. Grounds, CPA
IAC Chapters 24 and 25
Dallas/Ft.Worth and Houston


                


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